This presentation has been produced to present to Brighton and Hove Committee review panel and the Conservation Advisory group.

The client, Buckingham Developments (Brighton Ltd), is looking to convert No. 76-79 Buckingham Road back to C3 dwelling houses and replace No. 80 Buckingham Road with a new residential building with community facilities at the lower level.

01

The Site

Location

The Site

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Site summary

The property is located within 0.2 miles of Brighton railway station and 1 mile of Brighton seafront and its world-renowned cultural amenities.

80 Buckingham Road is a five-storey building constructed in the 1970s with undercroft car parking accessed from Buckingham Street. The building is situated at the corner of Buckingham Road, Upper Gloucester Road and Buckingham Street. The established land use of the building is non-residential institution (Class D1).

76-79 Buckingham Road is formed of four Victorian terraced houses. The building height ranges from four storeys above grade at the northern end to five storeys at the southern most end. The buildings were previously converted to form two residential units (Class C3) and a commercial kitchen in the lower ground level, with non-residential institution (Class D1) located from the ground floor up to the third floor.

The Site

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Site summary

The Site

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Site summary

Existing buildings

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The site currently comprises two connected buildings: No. 76-79 and No. 80.

No. 80 Buckingham Road is a 1970s building of five storeys with off-street parking accessed off Buckingham Street.The building was previously occupied by Brighton & Hove Council Adult Services. The services that were provided from this site were considered redundant, and the council vacated the property in March 2015. The services previously provided from the property are now delivered through local centres and home visits.

76-79 and 80 Buckingham Road are connected by a three- storey sky bridge from the third to fifth storey, which forms a development opportunity. The established use classes for the buildings are D1 and C3.

Existing buildings

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Existing buildings

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No. 76-79 Buckingham Road accommodates two flats (76A and 76B) at basement level, with the ground and upper floors converted and internally connected, most recently used as a mental health recovery centre. This facility was relocated to a new mental health recovery centre at 42 Frederick Place in November 2014, which continues to be operated by Southdown Recovery Services. The former accommodation at Buckingham Road was under utilised and constrained by the cellular nature of the accommodation split across a number of floors, and did not meet the needs of its users. The health facility has therefore been relocated to an accessible central location with new and improved accommodation across a single floor, which meets the needs of the services being provided. The building at 76-79 Buckingham Road has been vacant since November 2014.

Existing buildings

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Site history

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Buckingham Road was originally built on the former site of the Church Hill Poorhouse.

No. 80 Buckingham Road was originally on the ground of the Brighton Grammar School, which was converted into the Sussex Maternity Hospital in 1910 before closing in 1968. The building was then demolished and replaced with the current building.

The site is within West Hill Conservation Area, but the buildings themselves are not listed and there are no listed buildings within the immediate vicinity.

Site history

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Conservation area

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West Hill

“At the corner with Upper Gloucester Road is a large modern building built of light-coloured concrete block which replaced a building marked as ‘Brighton Grammar School’ on the 1876 map. This building appears to merge in with the streetscape along Buckingham Road (although the slate hanging to the upper floors is perhaps a little heavy) but is very discordant, due to its bulk and siting, when viewed from Upper Gloucester Road.

Beyond the new building is a long terrace, again of the 1870s, which curves along the line of Buckingham Road towards Dyke Road. Overall Buckingham Road contains some excellent examples of continuous terraced housing balanced by the more spacious semi-detached villas on the opposite side of the road.”

“Materials - Virtually all of the buildings in the West Hill Conservation Area are rendered which reflects the mid late 19th century, when most of them were built. Most are painted with pastel colours, with some examples of natural coloured render (a light brown) remaining. However there are some brick buildings including a terrace of red brick houses in Buckingham Road.... Boundary walls are also largely rendered, with some notable examples of original cast iron railings remaining. Roofs were originally Welsh slate but many of the buildings have been re-roofed using concrete tiles. Windows tend to be vertical sliding sashes, unfortunately many have been replaced with uPVC or stained hardwood.”

Extract from West Hill Conservation Area Characther Statement

Conservation area

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Transport connections

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76-80 Buckingham Road is situated in a highly accessible location. It is within walking distance of all the major attractions:

  • Brighton Pier: 23 minutes’ walk
  • City centre: 17 minutes’ walk
  • Brighton Station: 5 minutes’ walk

Buckingham Road is also served by the small adjacent suburb of Seven Dials, a very popular area with coffee shops, restaurants, antique shops and boutiques. Its convenient proximity to the mainline railway station means Gatwick Airport and central London are each less than an hour away. There are bus stops situated immediately in front of the site on Upper Gloucester Road, connecting the site to Brighton, Beavendean, Kemp Town, Peacehaven and Saltdean.

Transport connections

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Neighbouring amenities

02

Design Evolution

Concept

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Completing the block

By introducing a new building on the site, we are looking to complete the streetscape along Buckingham Road and Buckingham Street, and turn the corner onto Upper Gloucester Road, allowing both of these elevations to become primary-facing.

Concept

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Completing the block

Concept

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Massing

The building steps down Upper Gloucester Road following the fall in the site levels. The continuous roofscape of the proposal also echoes the change of the site levels, connecting west and east.

Concept

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Massing

The building in context

Massing elevations

Building mass evolution

Upper Gloucester Road elevation

Bay windows

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Study of bays in the neighbourhood

“The bow window is wholly characteristic of the domestic buildings of Brighton and Hove from the end of the C18.... Whether half or full height the bow allowed both movement in the facades and wider views out from houses; particularly, in terraces at right angles to the seafront, they granted all-important views of the sea.... Canted Bay windows are almost exclusively a Victorian development and have often replaced earlier bows. They were easier to build using the larger window panes then beginning to be favoured (no curved glass).”

Extract from Brighton and Hove, Pevsner Architectural Guides, Nicholas Antram and Richard Morrice

Bay windows

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Study of bays in the neighbourhood

Bay windows

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Study of bays in the neighbourhood

Elevation study

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Buckingham Road

The proposed scheme looks to provide a modern design that reflects the key character and details of the properties within the conservation area without appearing pastiche.

The Buckingham Road elevation is designed to blend with the height and scale of the adjacent properties. Bays, a strong characteristic of Brighton, are a key element to our elevation design, echoing the shape and proportions of the terraced houses.

The horizontal grain of the terrace houses is also reflected in the detailing, responding to the character of the neighbouring townhouses.

Elevation study

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Buckingham Road

Elevation study

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Buckingham Street

The Buckingham Street elevation echoes the rhythm of the bays on the street. The proportions of the bays are reduced compared to the bays on Buckingham Road to better reflect the scale of the existing bays on surrounding properties.

Elevation study

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Buckingham Street

Elevation study

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Upper Gloucester Road

The Upper Gloucester Road elevation steps down following the site levels. The building wraps around the corner and acts as a gable wall, reflecting the particular street location. The elevation has punched windows expressing the function of the residential units behind, similar to other gable walls in the surrounding neighbourhood.

Whilst the solid balcony elements protrude on Buckingham Road and Buckingham Street,the pre-cast element is pushed into the elevation to respect the building line. The horizontal grain along Buckingham Road and Buckingham Street wraps around to form part of the Upper Gloucester Road elevation.

Elevation study

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Upper Gloucester Road

Rooftop concept

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Form and materials

The rooftop form echoes a traditional pitched roof while lifting at the corner to maximise the potential views of the sea. The continuous roofscape allows the building to step down and follow the fall in the site level seamlessly.

The proposal is a metal-clad roof with the scale of each plane broken down by playing with the angle/pattern of the tiles/seams.

Rooftop concept

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Form and materials

Materiality and colour study

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Neighbouring context

Materiality and colour study

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Neighbouring context

Proposed materials

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Proposed materials

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Key to images:

  1. Light-coloured render finish
  2. Light-coloured precast concrete
  3. Dark-coloured metal roof
  4. Dark-coloured metal detail
  1. Light-coloured render finish on Buckingham Road
  2. Light-coloured render finish on Buckingham Street
  3. Fitzroy place, London, by Sheppard Robson
  4. Athlete’s Village, London, by David Chipperfield
  5. Tailored house, London, by Liddicoat & Goldhill
  6. Newhall Be, Essex, by Alison Brooks
  7. Titanium zinc metal sheeting by Rhinezink
  8. UJ Lecture Theatre, South Africa, by GAPP Architects
  9. Metal railing on Buckingham Road
  10. Lommerrijk, Amsterdam, by Wingender Hovenier
  11. Cast iron metal works

Design development

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Scheme evolution

Design development

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Design changes from Pre-application 2 to Design Review Panel

Design development

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Design changes from Pre-application 2 to Design Review Panel

  1. Removal of the top floor on Buckingham Road
  2. Buckingham Road bay window design revised to respect the rhythm of the neighbouring buildings
  3. Buckingham Street elevation revised to respect the proportion of the neighbouring buildings
  4. Buckingham Street balconies set back to align with the projection of the existing bays
  5. Solid elements introduced to balcony, bay window and roof balustrade
  6. Upper Gloucester Road set back to create generous pavement zone
  7. Better defined building entrance
  8. Activated community centre entrance
  9. Use of render on the principle elevations

Design development

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Design changes from Design Review panel to Current scheme

Design development

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Design changes from Design Review panel to Current scheme

  1. Bay designed as one solid element to better reflect the bay in adjacent terrace houses
  2. Roof window shape revised with simpler geometry to better reflect the roof geometry
  3. Horizontal grain added
  4. Solid corner to the Buckingham Road and Upeer Gloucester Road Junction. Upper Gloucester Road elevation revised responding to the difference in character of the three surrounding streets.
  5. Solid balcony element expressed as an independent element pushed into the elevation
  6. Punch windows introduced responding to the particular street location
  7. Community centre entrance design revised to better reflect the surrounding. Chamfered corner entrance to commercial unit. More solid facade elements introduced to strengthen the corner of the building

Proposal

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  1. Light-coloured render finish
    Light-coloured render is one of the characteristics of the West Hill Conservation Area. To respect the surrounding area, a good-quality render finish will be used on the main facades.
  2. Light-coloured precast concrete
    Neutral-coloured precast concrete will be used in detailing such as balconies and bay window frames. The light-coloured material will blend with the rendered finish as well as add interest to the building elevations.
  3. Dark-coloured metal roof
    Dark-coloured metal will be used to echo the roof colour in the surrounding buildings.
  4. Dark-coloured metal detail
    In addition to the neutral backdrop, metalwork detailing will add interest to the proposal.

Proposal

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View from Buckingham Road NE

Proposal

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View from Upper Gloucester Road NW

Proposed elevation

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Building elevations

Proposed elevation

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Courtyard elevations

Terraced houses

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Buckingham Road

  • To the front facade of Buckingham Road, entrance stairs with traditional tiling and railings will be reinstated.
  • Any uPVC windows will be replaced with timber sashes on the western elevation.
  • Any uPVC rainwater goods will be replaced with traditional cast iron replacements and painted black.
  • The modern front door to No. 78 will be replaced with a traditional four-panelled pine door.
  • The extant decorative iron railings on Buckingham Road will be retained where present and reinstated with identical cast iron facsimile copies, painted black, where not.
  • The extant ‘chessboard’ polychrome walkway tiling to houses on Buckingham Road will be retained where present or reinstated with identical facsimile reclaimed copies where not.
  • The green covering to the canted bay roofs to Buckingham Road will be removed and the roofs returned to their original flat design.
  • Any alterations to the terrace undertaken during the previous development, such as the conversion of doors to windows and introduction of a ramp, will be reversed to better reveal the heritage significance of the terrace.

Terraced houses

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Buckingham Road

Terraced houses

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Rear of Buckingham Road

  • Integrated photovoltaic tiles that mimic the slate on the rear side of the roof
  • Generously sized bay window for sufficient daylight

Terraced houses

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Rear of Buckingham Road

Sustainability strategy

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Natural ventilation
The climate is such that the building can be naturally ventilated and passively cooled for up to 80% of the year if the architecture is appropriately optimised.

Sustainability strategy

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Super insulation and exposed thermal mass
A well-insulated building can drastically reduce the size of the mechanical heating plant while reducing the need for it to run for most of the year, saving on maintenance and energy costs. Well-insulated buildings are also a lot quieter, making them more pleasant, hospitable and peaceful to entertain and sleep in. The walls and windows can dampen street noise from waste removal lorries, buses or other nuisances.

Exposing thermal mass to the occupied space allows buildings to be more passively conditioned. When coupled with the night flushing strategy, above, thermal mass drastically reduces the risk of overheating in the event of a prolonged heat wave and typical subsequent electrical grid brownouts.

Sustainability strategy

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Smart thermostat and efficient appliances
Smart thermostats are easy to use and learn your schedule, no programming required. They’re controllable from your smartphone, and have add-ons available for security and safety, like cameras and smoke alarms, CO, etc.

If the envelope strategy works successfully, appliances (televisions, refrigerators, washers, dryers, ovens, personal computers, devices etc) become 40% to 60% of a home’s energy. Selecting best-in-class efficient appliances as well as managing their standby losses by turning them off when not in use can cut this energy consuming category in half.

Sustainability strategy

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On-site renewable energy
We are considering integrated photovoltaic tiles that mimic slate to the rear of the townhouses. We are considering this integrated technology because there have been precedent cases allowing listed buildings or semi-historical buildings in a conservation area to produce their own renewable energy on site. They’ve done so without impacting the aesthetic integrity of the neighbourhood.

03

Layout

Building section

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The proposals include converting the four properties at No. 76-79 back into residential use, providing four individual townhouses, removing the recent external additions, and restoring the original frontages and appearance of the properties. The proposal looks to provide approximately 1,227m2/13,207ft2 of residential accommodation within the Victorian dwellings.

Building section

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Building section

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A new building on the site of No. 80 Buckingham Road will provide residential use on the ground floor and four upper floors. The proposal accommodates 20 residential units (approximately 1,593m2/17,142ft2), with the community use (approximately 60m2/646ft2 ) at lower ground level along with car parking spaces, secure cycle spaces and plant facilities.

Building section

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Amount

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Areas and transport

Cycle numbers
There is accommodation for 42 cycle spaces: 38 for residential parking, 4 for community space staff and 3 external visitor spaces to be located on Buckingham Street.

Parking
It is proposed to provide 2 disabled bays plus 6 parking bays for residential use. We are looking at locations for 2 on-street disabled bays for visitors to the community space in the spaces previously occupied as ambulance bays. Additionally, it is suggested that the remaining on-street ambulance bays associated with the previous site use are converted to additional blue badge bays, car club bays or short-term cycle parking.

Refuse
The waste/bin store will be located on the lower ground floor of No. 80. The size of the waste store is calculated based of Brighton & Hove City Council’s recommendation (Pan 05).

Amount

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Areas and transport

Proposed layout

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Lower ground floor No. 80

Community use
The proposed scheme has taken account of adopted Local Plan Policy HO20 in setting out how the accommodation within No. 80 is no longer required for community use by the council, and also incorporates a replacement unit for community use within the scheme as part of the site’s redevelopment to ensure full compliance with criteria (d). The new accommodation for community use is provided at street level, with an active frontage opening onto Buckingham Street to ensure an accessible, visible and usable unit. The proposed unit will provide around 60m2 of replacement flexible community floor space, which could be used in a variety of ways depending on the needs of the local community

Proposed layout

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Lower ground floor No. 80

Proposed layout

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Lower ground floor No. 76-79

Proposed layout

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Ground floor

Proposed layout

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1st floor

Proposed layout

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2nd floor

Proposed layout

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3rd floor

Proposed layout

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4th floor

Proposed layout

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Roof

04

Contact

Enquiries

Please email info@buckingham-developments.com if you have any enquiries regarding Buckingham Developments.